In The Waiting

I really don’t like waiting. Maybe it’s because I’ve been conditioned to expect things in a relatively timely fashion, or perhaps it’s just because I’m an impatient person. I don’t really think the latter part is the case, however, as I’ve been known to wait patiently for what can sometimes seem like an eternity for something I truly desire.

As American’s, we’ve been conditioned through years of drive-thru’s and quick service establishments that fast is good and having to wait for something is a major inconvenience.

However, I’ve constantly been reminded that some things in life are well worth the wait.

I’ll wait for the girl who accepts me and loves me for who I am- not for who I want to be.

I’ll wait for divine direction, and trust that my creator has a good plan for his creation.

I’ll wait for a lot of things, but I guess the point is I can’t always say l take joy in the waiting.

I’m fully aware that sometimes one can wait for an opportunity that seemingly goes nowhere, but I don’t think that the process of waiting and developing patience is somehow pointless.

In the waiting, we are often exposed to our truest and rawest forms of ourselves. We can’t do anything to magically get us from point A to point B- so we either can choose to rely on ourselves and our limited understanding, or we can turn to the heavens and look above.

So maybe I won’t see anything tangible come from this period of waiting, but I know I can use it to get a better glimpse of God’s face.

And if I can draw closer to God and gain further wisdom and understanding, then the waiting really isn’t in vain, is it?

In Psalms 130:5-6, David once beautifully expressed his waiting dilemma like this:

I wait eagerly for the Lord’s help,
and in his word I trust.
I wait for the Lord
more eagerly than sentries wait for the dawn;
than sentries wait for the dawn.

Regardless of what this period of waiting does or doesn’t bring; I know that it is building endurance and faith.

And perhaps that’s the greatest gift that this waiting period will bring.

 

Advertisements

On Life, Death, and Everything In-Between

Admittedly up far too late tonight reflecting on life and death and everything in between. Maybe this won’t be a popular opinion, but I’m convinced most of us live throughout life without honestly ever thinking about death and what we’re willing to die for.
If we don’t know what we’re willing to die for, then how can we truly live?
How can we ever live to the fullest when we get so caught up in the most trivial of things? To merely exist on a whim and to act as if time isn’t the most precious gift that there is is to waste the gift of life itself. Our actions should be intentional. We must love intentionally. Serve intentionally. And place others before ourselves in all that we do. It isn’t enough to merely sing on Sunday and worship God one day a week; indeed praise can and must be a mindset that we continually work on and show through our actions and deeds.
Young people aren’t leaving the church in droves because the music isn’t hip enough or the cafe isn’t serving Starbucks; they’re leaving because they don’t feel welcomed and the faith that is shown on Sunday morning doesn’t feel genuine. The gospel of Jesus and its message are timeless truths. The challenge that the church faces in attracting young people is proving to them that they will be loved and welcomed no matter where they’re at in life.
Because let’s face it, nobody has all their stuff together.
The church is a hospital for sinners.
Some patients are in more critical conditions than others, but in the end, we all have fallen desperately short.
What’s the ailment to our brokenness? Jesus.
Therefore, one of the best things the church can do is to create an environment that shows Jesus to the fullest extent possible.
And since Jesus is love, that means showing love to the fullest extent humanly possible.